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Country Code Names Supporting Organization (ccNSO)

The Country Code Names Supporting Organization (ccNSO) is responsible for developing global policies for country-code Top-Level Domains (ccTLD), promoting consensus within the ccNSO community and coordinating with other Supporting Organizations, committees and constituencies.  For more information on the ccNSO, click here.

ccNSO Organization Review

The goal of the review, to be undertaken pursuant to such criteria and standards as the Board shall direct, shall be to determine (i) whether that organization, council or committee has a continuing purpose in the ICANN structure, (ii) if so, whether any change in structure or operations is desirable to improve its effectiveness and (iii) whether that organization, council or committee is accountable to its constituencies, stakeholder groups, organizations and other stakeholders.

These periodic reviews shall be conducted no less frequently than every five years, based on feasibility as determined by the Board. Each five-year cycle will be computed from the moment of the reception by the Board of the final report of the relevant review Working Group.

The graphic below illustrates phases and status of each review - a  indicates that all activities within a given phase have been completed.  The chart that follows the graphic provides further details of key activities and milestones within each phase – you can view these details by clicking on each of the phases in the graphic.  The table also contains links to relevant documents.

PhaseActivityDescriptionStart DateDocuments
Plan ReviewAppointment of review team membersAppointment of review team members26 Jun 2009
Terms of ReferenceDocument outlining the scope of work adopted by the Board17 Aug 2009
RFP for Independent EvaluatorRequest for Proposals for consulting services17 Aug 2009
Questions and Answers on RFPQuestions and Answers received during the bidding phase17 Aug 2009
Conduct ReviewFinal Report of External ConsultantOrganisational Review of ICANN’s Country Code Names Supporting Organisation Final Report15 Jun 2010
Addendum to Final Report of External ConsultantAddendum: Full written responses to survey on perceptions of the ccNSO prepared by ITEMS International15 Jun 2010
Public comment on External Consultant’s Final ReportPublic comment on ITEMS International Final Report15 Jun 2010
Draft ReportDraft report posted for public comment15 Nov 2010
Public Comments on Draft ReportSummary of public comments on the ccNSO review draft working group report25 Jan 2011
Final ReportFinal report submitted to ICANN Board4 Mar 2011
Board receipt and action on the Final ReportBoard action and resolution18 Mar 2011
External Consultant Survey SnapshotItems International snapshot overview of the survey28 Jan 2010
Plan ImplementationBoard receipt of Implementation PlanBoard receipt of Implementation Plan11 Jun 2011
Implement ImprovementsDetails of implementation and periodic updatesInformation available on the ICANN website11 Sep 2013

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Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as"""" is not an IDN."