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ICANN Fellowship Participants | ICANN73

The following individuals had been selected to participate in ICANN73 Community Forum to be held 5-10 March 2022 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, North America.

Name Country or region of residence Working sector and/or area of interest
Adrian Ariel Schmidt Canada Academia
Ahmad Al Aghar United States of America Business & Commerce, Security
Ahmed Medien Canada Civil Society
Alexiaa Jordan United States of America Business & Commerce, ICANN Contracted Party, Internet service providers and connectivity providers
Allan Magezi Uganda Civil Society, Internet service providers and connectivity providers
Ayesha Iftikhar Pakistan Academia, Civil Society, Technical, Security
Bendjedid Rachad Sanoussi Benin Academia, Technical Security
Bolutife Adisa Nigeria Civil Society, ICANN Contracted Party
Eva Nadege Ncho Cote d'Ivoire Internet service providers and connectivity providers, Technical
Frank Anati Ghana Internet service providers and connectivity providers, Technical, Security
Georgina Iva Sakimi Naigulevu Fiji Business & Commerce, Civil Society, Technical
Isaac Majeed Ghana Business & Commerce
Jackline Akello Kenya Civil Society
James Paek United States of America Academia, Business & Commerce, Civil Society, Intellectual Property
Keolebogile Rantsetse Botswana Academia, Internet End User
Koupam Malick Alassane Benin Academia, Internet End User, Technical, Security - Recipient of Tarek Kamel Fellowship Recognition
Laxmi Prasad Yadav Nepal Academia, Internet End User, Technical
Marko Paloski North Macedonia ICANN Contracted Party, Internet service providers and connectivity providers, Technical
Md. Mahedi Hasan Bangladesh Internet service providers and connectivity providers
Megan Kathure Kenya ccTLD Operations, Business & Commerce, Civil Society
Mouloud Khelif Switzerland Civil Society, Internet service providers and connectivity providers
Nabeel Yasin Mohammed Amin Yemen Academia, Internet service providers and connectivity providers, Technical
Naeem Uddin Pakistan Academia, Civil Society, Technical
Nepomucene Mucowimana Burundi ccTLD Operations
Nojus Saad Iraq Civil Society, Internet End User
Pavanaja Ubaradka Bellippady India Academia, Civil Society, Technical
Pavel Farhan Thailand Academia, Civil Society, Technical
Prince Andrew Livingstone Zutah Ghana Civil Society, Technical, Security
Rashid Munir Pakistan Academia, Civil Society, Internet End User
Robert Nkambwe Uganda Academia, Technical, Security
Romulo Chacin Gonzalez Venezuela Academia, Internet End User, Security
Samik Kharel Nepal Academia, Civil Society, Internet End User
Sheilla Ayot Nyeko Uganda Academia
Simone Catania Germany ICANN Contracted Party, Internet service providers and connectivity providers

Note: All information above is self-reported by applicants.

Mentors:

  • Jenifer Lopez – ccNSO
  • Farell Folly – GNSO
  • Kristina Hakobyan – GAC
  • Afifa Abbas – RSSAC
  • Alfredo Calderon – At-Large
Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."