Skip to main content

ICANN's Move to Zoom: Follow-up Status Update and Response to Feedback

As previously announced, ICANN org is deploying Zoom as ICANN's official remote participation (RP) platform. We are on track to transition entirely to Zoom in time for ICANN65 in Marrakech, Morocco.

To reiterate from my previous blog, this change is being driven by a need for information security and data privacy, as well as stability and usability of the platform. In head-to-head testing, Zoom excels in these aspects. Early adopters also have confirmed that the Zoom experience is substantially better, particularly when on-the-go.

Thus far, the feedback we've received from both early adopters and those who read the blog has been minimal but positive. In total, there were fewer than ten specific comments, and a handful of concerns were raised. We would like to address those concerns here.

The primary concern is the potential loss of recordings from our Adobe Connect instance. I can assure you that work to preserve these is in progress. We are working with our Adobe Connect provider to develop a concrete solution.

I am also happy to report that Zoom webinars can hold up to 500 people at once, the same as Adobe Connect. All the vital features of a successful RP platform, such as chat, hand-raising, polling, and document-sharing, are available in Zoom.

We have a great working relationship with Zoom. Following our request, their team has added a feature where the participant list will now show those with hands raised in the order they were raised. This flexibility and willingness to work with us has been a refreshing aspect of our migration to Zoom.

One specific concern remains unaddressed: the inability for each user to view chat activity that occurred prior to joining the meeting. While we do not yet have a fix for this, Zoom has taken it on as a feature request. We look forward to reporting back with an update soon.

In choosing Zoom, we undertook a customary techno-economic feasibility study. Our own technical tests, paired with the user-experience feedback, confirm that Zoom is the right choice. Though not a driver, cost-savings were certainly a welcome bonus.

Please continue to provide us with feedback, comments, concerns, or questions as you begin to acclimate to Zoom. We look forward to hearing from you. Rest assured that ICANN org remains committed to providing the community with a feature-appropriate, techno-economically optimal RP platform.

Comments

    Cheryl Langdon-Orr  16:43 UTC on 10 May 2019

    One matter that effects me as I all too frequently am needing to attend several ICANN RP calls simultaneously is the forced leaving of the other meeting on a fresh login... So much for on the go convenience, when I need to have a device/ login per session ... Also several of the Working Groups I engage in find the forced use of view a shared screen with no option for individuals to scroll change text size etc., is causing some vexation. Result is separate windows being used to offer local and personal views of the hopefully most recent documentation, and that looses ready access to the Zoom room features, chat, hand ques etc , as even hosts and presenters learn to manage and oversee their limited screen realestate.

    Cheryl Langdon-Orr  16:44 UTC on 10 May 2019

    One matter that effects me as I all too frequently am needing to attend several ICANN RP calls simultaneously is the forced leaving of the other meeting on a fresh login... So much for on the go convenience, when I need to have a device/ login per session ... Also several of the Working Groups I engage in find the forced use of view a shared screen with no option for individuals to scroll change text size etc., is causing some vexation. Result is separate windows being used to offer local and personal views of the hopefully most recent documentation, and that looses ready access to the Zoom room features, chat, hand ques etc , as even hosts and presenters learn to manage and oversee their limited screen realestate.

    forwardpathway  17:54 UTC on 15 May 2019

    有关于美国留学的问题欢迎添加美国续航教育微信咨询:14127376610

    Mike Brennan  09:49 UTC on 24 May 2019

    Thank you for bringing this up, Cheryl. To your first point, it is actually possible to join multiple Zoom meetings at once by making use of the "Start from your browser" link on the page which launches before joining a meeting. In browser, you can open multiple meetings in separate browser tabs. I've tested this with up to 3 concurrent meetings, and the Zoom web interface functions best in Google Chrome. To your second point, unfortunately there is a trade-off with Zoom's use of screen sharing vs. Adobe Connect's uploaded documents. While we do lose a bit of convenience and functionality, we gain a measure of data security as well as reliability. I'm sure you've been a part of Adobe Connect meetings in the past where a page of a presentation created an error, or the graphics somehow failed to render. With screen sharing in Zoom, this is no longer an issue. Thank you again for your feedback. It's extremely valuable to hear this input from the community, particularly from our most active users such as yourself!

Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."