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ICANN Donates $50k to Internet Governance Forum Support Association

Donation is Part of a Larger ICANN Commitment of $330k to Ensure IGF Remains Key Venue for Internet Policy Dialogue

Los Angeles, California… The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced today that it has donated USD$50,000 to the Internet Governance Forum Support Association (IGFSA).

"I'm delighted to announce this donation," said Fadi Chehadé, President and CEO of ICANN. "The IGF is an incredibly important part of the global Internet governance ecosystem, and it's my hope that this additional funding will allow the IGF to remain a vital part of the ongoing discussion."

This donation is part of a larger commitment by ICANN to support the IGF globally as well as the regional IGF's. It will allow the IGF to continue to serve as the essential meeting place for the multistakeholder community to discuss the critical policy issues that affect Internet governance and demonstrate best practice. Last fiscal year ICANN contributed USD$280,000 to support the IGF globally and regionally. With this new contribution to the IGFSA, it will raise the total support from ICANN this fiscal year FY15 to a total of USD$330,000.

"The continued success of the Internet depends on forums like the IGF, which allow the multistakeholder model, that relies heavily on open dialogue, to prosper and thrive," said Tarek Kamel, Senior Advisor to ICANN's President on Government Engagement. Kamel, is also a member of the Executive Committee of the IGFSA. He further noted, "With this donation, we affirm ICANN's support for the IGF and look forward to a successful IGF 2015 in Brazil."

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Established by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2006, the IGF is a multistakeholder forum that addresses key Internet governance issues. To learn more go to http://www.intgovforum.org/

The Internet Governance Forum Support Association, established by the Internet Society Board of Trustees in September 2014, is an independent association established to help secure funding and support for the IGF. To learn more go to http://www.igfsa.org/

Media Contacts

Brad White
Director of Communications, North America
Washington, D.C.
Tel: +1 202 570 7119
Email: brad.white@icann.org

James Cole
Global Media Coordinator
Washington, D.C.
Tel: +1 202 570 7139
Email: james.cole@icann.org

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet you have to type an address into your computer – a name or a number. That address has to be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN coordinates these unique identifiers across the world. Without that coordination we wouldn't have one global Internet. ICANN was formed in 1998. It is a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with participants from all over the world dedicated to keeping the Internet secure, stable and interoperable. It promotes competition and develops policy on the Internet's unique identifiers. ICANN doesn't control content on the Internet. It cannot stop spam and it doesn't deal with access to the Internet. But through its coordination role of the Internet's naming system, it does have an important impact on the expansion and evolution of the Internet. For more information please visit: www.icann.org.

Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."