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Supporting Community Policy and Advice Work – A Few Key Indicators

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Earlier this week, the Policy Development Support Department published the Post-ICANN61 Policy Report. The report captures decisions and outcomes from the work of the three Supporting Organizations (SOs) and four Advisory Committees (ACs) at the San Juan meeting this past March. The report also looks ahead and suggests additional resources to enable sustained community engagement on important issues.

At ICANN61, the department supported over 180 community sessions – and the work continues. Through the third quarter of FY18, we have supported over 900 teleconferences totaling over 1,000 hours. There have also been over 17,000 mailing list exchanges. These are good indicators of the intensity of community work.

Supporting Community Policy and Advice Work – A Few Key Indicators

As the community and its workload grow, the Policy Development Support Department is ready to support ongoing activity and assist with the community's prioritization efforts. Our department consists of subject matter and secretariat experts located around the world. We are organized into teams to support the policy and advice development work across the community, including the post-transition groups of the Customer Standing Committee (CSC) and Root Zone Evolution Review Committee (RZERC), as well as the Empowered Community Administration.

Supporting Community Policy and Advice Work – A Few Key Indicators

This graph shows the membership levels in the SOs and ACs. For more information, please refer to Objective 1.3 in the Accountability Indicators.

Working with their respective support teams, the Councils of the three Supporting Organizations are currently managing a number of projects, including:

  • 5 active Policy Development Processes (PDP) working groups in the Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO);
  • 1 PDP in the Country Code Names Supporting Organization (ccNSO); and
  • 1 global policy proposal in the Address Supporting Organization (ASO).

Supporting Community Policy and Advice Work – A Few Key Indicators

This graph demonstrates the number of active working groups and other activities in the SOs and ACs. For more information, please refer to Objective 1.3 in the Accountability Indicators.

The ACs continue to provide input to these PDPs and other organizational matters such as the Draft FY19 Operating Plan and Budget and the proposal to restart the Root Key Signing Key (KSK) Rollover Process. Various working groups are exploring other issues such as human rights and international law, the distribution of anycast instances, name collisions, and capacity building, among many other topics.

Supporting Community Policy and Advice Work – A Few Key Indicators

This graph tracks the number of completed working groups and published advice/resolutions from the SOs and ACs. For more information, please refer to Objective 1.3 in the Accountability Indicators.

All of this activity runs in parallel to several organizational and specific reviews, cross-community working groups, and general administration and governance work. Of course, our teams also support several other critical projects such as community recognition, the public comment process, and community planning for ICANN Public Meetings.

With less than three months to go before the ICANN62 Policy Forum, it is always a busy time for the Policy Development Support Department. We will soon announce the dates for our Pre-ICANN62 Policy Webinar sessions. Until then, we look forward to seeing you online and soon in Panama!

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    Domain Name System
    Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."