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ICANN Ombudsman Announces Departure | Search for a Successor to Begin Immediately

2010 年 10 月 28 日

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  • English

Frank Fowlie has announced that he will be leaving his position as Ombudsman for the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), effective on or before 31 January 2011.

"After six years with ICANN, I have logged 794 days in travel status, or about two years and five months away from home," said Fowlie in announcing his departure to the ICANN staff. "It's time for me to spend a bit more time at home with my wonderful wife."

"Frank has been instrumental in establishing ICANN's first online presence for the Ombudsman's office," said Peter Dengate Thrush, Chairman of the ICANN Board. "We wish him all the best and we will begin a search immediately to find a suitable successor." Fowlie has agreed to stay at ICANN long enough to help with the transition of his successor.

The ICANN Ombudsman serves as an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) office for anyone in the ICANN community who may wish to lodge a complaint about a staff or board decision. The Ombudsman also hears grievances about any particular action or lack of action. The office is aimed at ensuring that members of the ICANN community have been treated fairly, while acting as an impartial officer.

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To learn more about ICANN Ombudsman, go here: http://www.icann.org/ombudsman/.

CONTACTS:
Brad White – Director of Global Media Affairs
Washington, DC USA
Ph: +1 202.570.7118
brad.white@icann.org

Michele Jourdan – Media & Marketing Coordinator
Los Angeles, CA USA
Ph. +1 310.301.5831
michele.jourdan@icann.org







About ICANN: ICANN's mission is to ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet you have to type an address into your computer - a name or a number. That address has to be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN coordinates these unique identifiers across the world. Without that coordination we wouldn't have one global Internet. ICANN was formed in 1998. It is a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with participants from all over the world dedicated to keeping the Internet secure, stable and interoperable. It promotes competition and develops policy on the Internet's unique identifiers. ICANN doesn't control content on the Internet. It cannot stop spam and it doesn't deal with access to the Internet. But through its coordination role of the Internet's naming system, it does have an important impact on the expansion and evolution of the Internet. For more information please visit: www.icann.org.