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Community Travel Support

ICANN provides travel support for selected community members in order to advance the work of ICANN; to provide support for those who might not be able to afford to attend ICANN meetings otherwise; and to broaden participation in ICANN's processes.

In order to clarify the level and processes required to provide travel support for community members, to ensure that travel support is administered effectively and efficiently, and to ensure that ICANN's principles of accountability and transparency are honored, the following documents are posted on this webpage:

The Travel Support Guidelines describe the levels and methodologies for travel support for community members. The Guidelines are included as part of the annual ICANN budget development process. Draft Guidelines are posted to solicit community feedback through online fora, conference calls with constituencies and workshops at ICANN meetings. The final Travel Support Guideline for each fiscal year is posted in alignment with the Board approved annual budget.

The Travel Summary is provided for each supported traveler for each ICANN meeting and describes specific details about all travel administration including how to book itineraries, deadlines to follow, etc. The Summary for each ICANN meeting is posted after the immediately preceding meeting, allowing for enough time to obtain visa, book itineraries and obtain most cost effective pricing.

Travel Reports are provided for each ICANN meeting. The Travel Report provides information about the support provided including which community members were provided support as well as the level of support provided.

Travel Support Guidelines

The FY14 Travel Support Guidelines have been posted (see link below). The Travel Support Guidelines describe the proposed process for how supported constituent stakeholder travelers may book transportation to/from an ICANN Meeting during FY14.

Travel Summary

2014

51 – Los Angeles Meeting:

50 – London Meeting:

49 – Singapore Meeting:

2013

48 – Buenos Aires Meeting:

47 – Durban Meeting:

46 – Beijing Meeting:

2012

45 – Toronto Meeting:

44 – Prague Meeting:

43 – Costa Rica Meeting:

2011

42 – Dakar Meeting:

41 – Singapore Meeting:

40 – Silicon Valley in San Francisco Meeting:

Travel Summary for Silicon Valley in San Francisco (untranslated):

2010

39 – Cartagena Meeting:

37 – Nairobi Meeting:

2009

36 – Seoul Meeting:

35 – Sydney Meeting:

Community Travel Questions and Answers: http://www.icann.org/en/news/in-focus/travel-support/community-travel-procedure-add-info-21aug08-en.htm

Travel Support Reports

2013

47 – Durban Meeting:

46 – Beijing Meeting:

2012

45 – Toronto Meeting:

44 – Prague Meeting:

43 – Costa Rica Meeting:

2011

42 – Dakar Meeting:

41 – Singapore Meeting:

40 – Silicon Valley Meeting:

2010

39 – Cartagena Meeting:

38 – Brussels Meeting:

37 – Nairobi Meeting:

2009

36 – Seoul Meeting:

35 – Sydney Meeting:

34 – Mexico City Meeting:

2008

33 – Cairo Meeting:

Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."