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TLD Application Review Update

  • On Monday, 2 October 2000 the application period for those seeking to sponsor or operate new TLDs ended. A total of 47 applications were received during the application period. Fourty-four of these applications are still active.
  • ICANN has completed the following steps in its review of applications:
    • Acknowledging receipt of applications.
    • Reviewing the applications to ensure they include all the required parts. All applications being considered now have all the required major parts, though some still appear to be missing exhibits, postable HTML versions, etc.
    • Verifying payment of the application fee. Two of the 47 applications submitted were not accompanied by the US $50,000 application fee. These two applications (.number/.tel/.phone and .wap) have been returned.
    • Performing an initial review of confidentiality requests and contacting applicants to notify them of the disposition of the request. One of the 47 applications (.nyc) has been withdrawn because the applicant and ICANN did not agree on treatment of confidentiality claims.
  • ICANN is currently involved in the following aspects of the review:
    • Where an application seeks alternative or multiple TLD strings, verifying that it is a single application (i.e. that all parts of the application apply, without significant variation, to all of the strings). Applicants submitting materials that constitute more than one application will be notified in the next several days.
    • Posting non-confidential portions of applications on the ICANN web site.We are working to get all the applications posted as soon as possible. In some cases, we are awaiting resolution of confidentiality claims so that we can post the application material for public comment. In other cases, we are working to correct problems with the electronic versions of applications that were submitted. We expect the majority of the posting to be completed soon.
  • Initial technical, business/financial, and legal review of applications.

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Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."