Skip to main content

The Future of the Internet – YouTubery in action

There is a large OECD ministerial meeting in Seoul later this month (and just a week before the ICANN Paris meeting), that has as its title: “The Future of the Internet Economy”.

The technical community – including ICANN – is hosting a one-day conference prior to the two-day ministerial proper, where the world’s most powerful governments will look at what the future of this network is: the possibilities and the threats; the creative and the criminal; and the lessons learnt as well as the best policy approaches going forward. ICANN will be represented by CEO Paul Twomey. And Vint Cerf will also be there to provide his insights.

The OECD’s YouTube channel for the Future of the Internet

But in an effort to reach out beyond the CEOs, world experts and government ministers, the OECD has set up a YouTube channel where it invites anyone to submit their video about what they see as the future of the Internet and encourages people to answer the question: “How can the Internet make the world a better place?” You are invited to “ask a question or share an opinion with world leaders to influence the future of the Internet.”

If past experience is anything to go by, the ICANN community has pretty strong views on where the future of the Internet should be, so here’s your chance to have them heard in one of the most powerful and influential inter-governmental bodies out there.

For more information, the OECD has a webpage explaining all. The YouTube channel itself is at: http://www.youtube.com/futureinternet.

Comments

    Domain Name System
    Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."