Skip to main content

A Conversation with Community Leader Lise Fuhr

Denmark community lise fuhr blog 01

Lise Fuhr is a leader in the Internet community in Denmark. Here, she reflects on what ICANN58 means for Denmark – and what are the key issues she will focus on at the meeting.  

Tell us a little about yourself and your involvement in ICANN.

I’m currently Director General at the European Telecommunications Network Operators' Association (ETNO), the association that includes Europe’s leading providers of telecommunication and digital services. In ICANN, ETNO is an active in the Internet Service Providers and Connectivity Providers (ISPCP) and the Business Constituency (BC).

I’ve had several roles in the ICANN community, as a member of the Second Accountability and Transparency Review Team (ATRT2) and as co-chair of the Cross-Community Working Group that developed the proposal for the Internet Assigned Names Authority (IANA) stewardship transition. At present, I am a Board member of the ICANN affiliate Public Technical Identifiers (PTI), which is responsible for the operation of the IANA functions.

In the past, I was COO of Danish registry DIFO and DK Hostmaster, the entities responsible for the country code top-level domain (ccTLD) .dk. I have also worked for the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation and for Telia Networks.

ICANN is all about the multistakeholder model. We actively seek participation from diverse cross-sections of society. From your perspective, what does the multistakeholder model of governance mean for the Denmark?

Having ICANN58 in Copenhagen will help build an even stronger awareness of the role of Internet governance and of the multistakeholder model in Denmark. Today’s Internet ecosystem is broad – most societal and industrial sectors rely on the Internet. Almost every sector needs to take part in how the Internet is governed.

What relationship do you see between ICANN and its stakeholders and how would you like to see it evolve?

ETNO has always advocated for an active role in Internet governance. For this reason, we support the multistakeholder model, embodied by ICANN and its activities. We want to support ICANN as it takes its first steps after the transition. The multistakeholder model is an opportunity to bring positive values to the global Internet community. Freedom to invest and freedom to innovate both remain crucial to a thriving and diverse Internet environment.

What issues will you be following at ICANN58?

The discussion around the new generic top-level domains (gTLDs) will be very important. The program should be balanced and consider both the opportunities and the risks to be addressed. In addition, the work on enhancing ICANN’s accountability will also be essential to rounding out the good work done so far with the transition. Another important issue is the debate on the migration from Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) to Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6). Last but not least, trust is a top priority, so it’s important to participate in the discussions around security.

Comments

    tpv gratis  09:10 UTC on 20 April 2017

    Please Lise, prioritize IPv6 normalization

Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."