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Initial Evaluation Results Released for First Set of Applications

Today marks a major milestone in the New gTLD Program: Initial Evaluation (IE) results for the first set of new gTLD applications have been released to applicants and the general public.

This achievement is the result of many years of policy development and implementation work to bring diversity, competition, and innovation to the Domain Name System. Applicants, along with the greater ICANN community have dedicated countless hours toward reaching this goal. This is not only an important and exciting moment in the New gTLD Program but also in the continuing evolution of the Internet.

To view Initial Evaluation results for applications with priority numbers 1 through 30, go to the Current Application Status page of the new gTLD microsite. Results are posted under the IE Results column. Clicking on the result will take you to the Initial Evaluation report for that application.

There are three possible outcomes of Initial Evaluation: Pass, Eligible for Extended Evaluation, or Ineligible for Further Review.

  • Pass - The evaluation panels determined that the application is consistent with the requirements in the Applicant Guidebook and can advance to the next phase of the Program.
  • Eligible for Extended Evaluation - The Financial, Technical/Operational, Registry Services, or Geographic Names evaluation panels determined that the application did not provide sufficient information to award a passing score. The application is eligible for extended evaluation.
  • Ineligible for Further Review - The DNS Stability, String Similarity, Background Screening, and/or Geographic Names evaluation panels determined that the application did not meet the relevant criteria in the Applicant Guidebook, and the application is ineligible for further review.

For some applications Initial Evaluation results were not yet available for one or more possible reasons such as: pending change requests, clarifying questions, or follow-up with applicants regarding missing information. The results for these applications will be published as soon as the relevant processes are completed.

As communicated previously, ICANN is releasing Initial Evaluation results in priority order, in increments of 30 per week, with plans to increase to 100 per week. ICANN anticipates having Initial Evaluation results for all applications published by the end of August 2013.

Next Steps

Applications that pass Initial Evaluation (and that do not face any objections or string contention) will be eligible to proceed to contracting, with execution of the Registry Agreement as early as 23 April 2013.

Visit the New gTLD microsite to stay up-to-date on the latest Initial Evaluation releases and news about the Program.


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Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as""icann.org"" is not an IDN."