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ICANN Ombudsman Announces Departure | Search for a Successor to Begin Immediately

Frank Fowlie has announced that he will be leaving his position as Ombudsman for the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), effective on or before 31 January 2011.

"After six years with ICANN, I have logged 794 days in travel status, or about two years and five months away from home," said Fowlie in announcing his departure to the ICANN staff. "It's time for me to spend a bit more time at home with my wonderful wife."

"Frank has been instrumental in establishing ICANN's first online presence for the Ombudsman's office," said Peter Dengate Thrush, Chairman of the ICANN Board. "We wish him all the best and we will begin a search immediately to find a suitable successor." Fowlie has agreed to stay at ICANN long enough to help with the transition of his successor.

The ICANN Ombudsman serves as an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) office for anyone in the ICANN community who may wish to lodge a complaint about a staff or board decision. The Ombudsman also hears grievances about any particular action or lack of action. The office is aimed at ensuring that members of the ICANN community have been treated fairly, while acting as an impartial officer.


To learn more about ICANN Ombudsman, go here:

Brad White – Director of Global Media Affairs
Washington, DC USA
Ph: +1 202.570.7118

Michele Jourdan – Media & Marketing Coordinator
Los Angeles, CA USA
Ph. +1 310.301.5831

About ICANN: ICANN's mission is to ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet you have to type an address into your computer - a name or a number. That address has to be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN coordinates these unique identifiers across the world. Without that coordination we wouldn't have one global Internet. ICANN was formed in 1998. It is a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with participants from all over the world dedicated to keeping the Internet secure, stable and interoperable. It promotes competition and develops policy on the Internet's unique identifiers. ICANN doesn't control content on the Internet. It cannot stop spam and it doesn't deal with access to the Internet. But through its coordination role of the Internet's naming system, it does have an important impact on the expansion and evolution of the Internet. For more information please visit:

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Domain Name System
Internationalized Domain Name ,IDN,"IDNs are domain names that include characters used in the local representation of languages that are not written with the twenty-six letters of the basic Latin alphabet ""a-z"". An IDN can contain Latin letters with diacritical marks, as required by many European languages, or may consist of characters from non-Latin scripts such as Arabic or Chinese. Many languages also use other types of digits than the European ""0-9"". The basic Latin alphabet together with the European-Arabic digits are, for the purpose of domain names, termed ""ASCII characters"" (ASCII = American Standard Code for Information Interchange). These are also included in the broader range of ""Unicode characters"" that provides the basis for IDNs. The ""hostname rule"" requires that all domain names of the type under consideration here are stored in the DNS using only the ASCII characters listed above, with the one further addition of the hyphen ""-"". The Unicode form of an IDN therefore requires special encoding before it is entered into the DNS. The following terminology is used when distinguishing between these forms: A domain name consists of a series of ""labels"" (separated by ""dots""). The ASCII form of an IDN label is termed an ""A-label"". All operations defined in the DNS protocol use A-labels exclusively. The Unicode form, which a user expects to be displayed, is termed a ""U-label"". The difference may be illustrated with the Hindi word for ""test"" — परीका — appearing here as a U-label would (in the Devanagari script). A special form of ""ASCII compatible encoding"" (abbreviated ACE) is applied to this to produce the corresponding A-label: xn--11b5bs1di. A domain name that only includes ASCII letters, digits, and hyphens is termed an ""LDH label"". Although the definitions of A-labels and LDH-labels overlap, a name consisting exclusively of LDH labels, such as"""" is not an IDN."