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Nomination for Chair of the Technical Panel on New Registry Services

ICANN is pleased to announce the nomination of Lyman Chapin as the Chair of the Technical Standing Panel for review of proposed new registry services. In accordance with the recently approved consensus policy adopting a process for the implementation of proposed new registry services (see http://www.icann.org/minutes/resolutions-08nov05.htm ) applying directly to all gTLD registries, the Chair will coordinate the technical evaluation of a proposed registry service along with a Standing Panel of experts.

The "Process for Consideration of Proposed Registry Services" defined in gTLD registry agreements states that "The Chair of the Standing Panel will be a person who is agreeable to both ICANN and the registry constituency of the supporting organization then responsible for generic top level domain registry policies."

ICANN Staff and the gTLD Registry Constituency of the GNSO have reached an agreement that Lyman Chapin is an outstanding candidate for the Chair position. A brief biography is included below.

The criteria against which this nomination was evaluated were primarily based on technical competence including the ability to understand nuances of potential security and stability measures that are important for the operation of the DNS. A description for the position is available below.

ICANN and the gTLD Registry Constituency invite the community to comment constructively on this nomination, in the forum that has been established for this purpose. Accompanying comments regarding the position description content will also be appreciated.

Click here to submit comments to the technical chair position and description

Click here to review comments submitted to the technical chair position

Comments must be submitted by 17 February 2006

 


 

Lyman Chapin

Lyman Chapin is a co-founder of and partner at Interisle Consulting Group , where he advises companies, non-profit organizations, and government agencies on telecommunications network resilience and critical infrastructure protection, and serves as an expert advisor on matters of Internet technology and governance. He was most recently Chief Scientist at NextHop Technologies , an Internet routing software company; before joining NextHop in 2001, he was Chief Scientist at BBN Technologies . Mr. Chapin is a Fellow of the IEEE, and was a founding trustee of the Internet Society . He was selected by the ICANN Address Supporting Organization and served as a Director on the ICANN Board board from 2001 to 2004, and has also served as chairman of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB ), the ACM Special Interest Group on Data Communication ( SIGCOMM ), and the ANSI and ISO standards groups responsible for Network and Transport layer networking standards. Mr. Chapin was a principal architect of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model and protocols, and is the co-author of Open Systems Networking - TCP/IP and OSI . He currently serves as the USA/ACM representative to the International Federation for Information Processing Technical Committee on Communication Systems (IFIP TC6) and recently completed a five-year term as the USA representative to the NATO Science Committee networking panel. Mr. Chapin's current professional interests include Internet technology, particularly internet work routing, traffic engineering, and the Domain Name System (DNS); Internet governance; and information security and personal privacy. He lives with his wife and two daughters in Hopkinton, MA (USA).

 


 

Job Description: Chair, Technical Panel on New Registry Services

The process for approval of new registry services as approved as a consensus policy by the ICANN Board on 8 November 2005 requires that specific resources be in place in relation to stability and security review provisions of such new services.

More specifically, ICANN may decide, within a specified review period of proposed new registry services, to refer proposed services to a Technical "Standing Panel". The panel will make an independent determination whether the proposed service raises any security or stability issues.

The Chair of the Technical Panel on New Registry Services will coordinate the technical evaluation of a proposed registry service through a standing panel of experts.

The Standing Panel shall consist of a total of 20 persons expert in the design, management and implementation of the complex systems and standards-protocols utilized in the Internet infrastructure and DNS. The expertise must be applicable to the DNS as it functions today and also to anticipation and measure of the effects of innovation that might add functionality, value or complexity to the name space.

The Chair of the Standing Panel will be a person who is agreeable to both ICANN and the registry constituency of the supporting organization then responsible for generic top level domain registry policies.

The members of the Standing Panel will be selected by its Chair. All members of the Standing Panel and the Chair shall execute an agreement requiring that they shall consider the issues before the panel neutrally and according to the definitions of Security and Stability.

For each matter referred to the Standing Panel, the Chair shall select no more than five members from the Standing Panel to evaluate the referred matter, none of which shall have an existing competitive, financial, or legal conflict of interest, and with due regard to the particular technical issues raised by the referral.

In the event that ICANN reasonably determines during the "preliminary determination" period that the proposed Registry Service might raise significant Stability or Security issues, ICANN will refer the proposal to the Standing Panel of experts and simultaneously invite public comment on the proposal.

The Standing Panel shall have 45 calendar days from the referral to prepare a written report regarding the proposed Registry Service's effect on Security or Stability (as defined below), which report (along with a summary of any public comments) shall be forwarded to the ICANN Board. The report shall set forward the opinions of the Standing Panel, including, but not limited to, a detailed statement of the analysis, reasons, and information upon which the panel has relied in reaching their conclusions, along with the response to any specific questions that were included in the referral from ICANN staff.

Upon ICANN's referral to the Standing Panel, Registry Operator may submit additional information or analyses regarding the likely effect on Security or Stability of the Registry Service.

Upon its evaluation of the proposed Registry Service, the Standing Panel will report on the likelihood and materiality of the proposed Registry Service's effects on Security or Stability, including whether the proposed Registry Service creates a reasonable risk of a meaningful adverse effect on Security or Stability

The following criteria are considered an important factor for the chair of this panel to hold:

  • technical competence including the ability to discern issues of importance necessary for a correct assessment of the case on hand,

  • business competence and business acumen,

  • independence,

  • to serve in an environment where time demands vary widely from time period time period.

Additionally, the chair is expected to have a general understanding of the following, or as an alternative, to be able to review and understand material regarding the following topics:

  • General description of registry facilities and systems, including specific types of systems being used; their capacity and interoperability, general availability and level of security,

  • Registry-registrar model and protocol,

  • The requirement to keep information synchronized across the various aspects of a TLD's operations,

  • Implications of scalability, impacts on caches not under registry control, DNSSec operations and DNS reliability and scalability in the absence of DNSSec,

  • Database capabilities including database software, size, throughput, scalability, procedures for object creation, editing, and deletion, change notifications, registrar transfer procedures, grace period implementation and reporting capabilities,

  • Zone file generation including procedures for changes, editing by registrars and updates; address frequency, security, process, interface, user authentication, logging and data back-up,

  • Zone file distribution and publication: locations of name servers, procedures for and means of distributing zone files to them,

  • Billing and collection systems: technical characteristics, system security, accessibility,

  • Backup frequency and procedures for backup of data; hardware and systems used, data format, identity of suggested escrow agent(s) and procedures for retrieval of data/rebuild of database,

  • Data escrow: escrow arrangements, data formats, insurance arrangements and backup plans for data recovery,

  • Publicly accessible WHOIS service: address software and hardware, connection speed, search capabilities and coordination with other WHOIS systems,

  • System security and physical security: technical and physical capabilities and procedures to prevent system hacks, break-ins, data tampering and other disruptions to operations,

  • Peak capacities: technical capability for handling a larger-than-projected demand for registration or load; effects of load on servers, databases, back-up systems, support systems, escrow systems, maintenance and personnel,

  • System reliability: define, analyze and quantify quality of planned service,

  • System outage prevention: procedures for problem detection, redundancy of all systems, backup power supply, facility security and technical security; the availability of backup software, operating system and hardware; the system monitoring, technical maintenance staff and server locations,

  • System recovery procedures: procedures for restoring the system to operation in the event of a system outage, both expected and unexpected; redundant/diverse systems for providing service in the event of an outage and describe the process for recovery from various types of failures; training of technical staff who will perform these tasks; the availability and backup of software and operating systems needed to restore the system to operation and the availability of the hardware needed to restore and run the system; backup electrical power systems and the projected time for system restoration; procedures for testing the process of restoring the system to operation in the event of an outage; documentation kept on system outages and on potential system problems that could result in outages, and

  • Technical and other support: support for registrars and for Internet users and registrants; technical help systems, personnel accessibility, web-based, telephone and other support services to be offered; time availability of support and language-availability of support.

APPENDIX

Evaluation of Proposed Registry Services Contractual Provisions

Registry Services. Registry Services are, for purposes of this Agreement, defined as the following: (a) those services that are both (i) operations of the registry critical to the following tasks: the receipt of data from registrars concerning registrations of domain names and name servers; provision to registrars of status information relating to the zone servers for the TLD; dissemination of TLD zone files; operation of the registry zone servers; and dissemination of contact and other information concerning domain name server registrations in the TLD as required by this Agreement; and (ii) provided by the Registry Operator for the .net registry as of the Effective Date, as the case may be; (b) other products or services that the Registry Operator is required to provide because of the establishment of a Consensus Policy (as defined in Section 3.1(b) above); (c) any other products or services that only a registry operator is capable of providing, by reason of its designation as the registry operator; and (d) material changes to any Registry Service within the scope of (a), (b) or (c) above. Only Registry Services defined in (a) and (b) above are subject to the maximum price provisions of Section 7.3, below.

Process for Consideration of Proposed Registry Services. Following written notification by Registry Operator to ICANN that Registry Operator may make a change in a Registry Service within the scope of the preceding paragraph:

(A) ICANN shall have 15 calendar days to make a "preliminary determination" whether a Registry Service requires further consideration by ICANN because it reasonably determines such Registry Service: (i) could raise significant Security or Stability issues or (ii) could raise significant competition issues.

(B) Registry Operator must provide sufficient information at the time of notification to ICANN that it may implement such a proposed Registry Service to enable ICANN to make an informed "preliminary determination." Information provided by Registry Operator and marked "CONFIDENTIAL" shall be treated as confidential by ICANN. Registry Operator will not designate "CONFIDENTIAL" information necessary to describe the purpose of the proposed Registry Service and the effect on users of the DNS.

(C) ICANN may seek expert advice during the preliminary determination period (from entities or persons subject to confidentiality agreements) on the competition, Security or Stability implications of the Registry Service in order to make its "preliminary determination." To the extent ICANN determines to disclose confidential information to any such experts, it will provide notice to Registry Operator of the identity of the expert(s) and the information it intends to convey.

(D) If ICANN determines during the 15 calendar day "preliminary determination" period that the proposed Registry Service, does not raise significant Security or Stability (as defined below), or competition issues, Registry Operator shall be free to deploy it upon such a determination.

(E) In the event ICANN reasonably determines during the 15 calendar day "preliminary determination" period that the Registry Service might raise significant competition issues, ICANN shall refer the issue to the appropriate governmental competition authority or authorities with jurisdiction over the matter within five business days of making its determination, or two business days following the expiration of such 15 day period, whichever is earlier, with notice to Registry Operator. Any such referral communication shall be posted on ICANN's website on the date of transmittal. Following such referral, ICANN shall have no further responsibility, and Registry Operator shall have no further obligation to ICANN, with respect to any competition issues relating to the Registry Service. If such a referral occurs, the Registry Operator will not deploy the Registry Service until 45 calendar days following the referral, unless earlier cleared by the referred governmental competition authority.

(F) In the event that ICANN reasonably determines during the 15 calendar day "preliminary determination" period that the proposed Registry Service might raise significant Stability or Security issues (as defined below), ICANN will refer the proposal to a Standing Panel of experts (as defined below) within five business days of making its determination, or two business days following the expiration of such 15 day period, whichever is earlier, and simultaneously invite public comment on the proposal. The Standing Panel shall have 45 calendar days from the referral to prepare a written report regarding the proposed Registry Service's effect on Security or Stability (as defined below), which report (along with a summary of any public comments) shall be forwarded to the ICANN Board. The report shall set forward the opinions of the Standing Panel, including, but not limited to, a detailed statement of the analysis, reasons, and information upon which the panel has relied in reaching their conclusions, along with the response to any specific questions that were included in the referral from ICANN staff. Upon ICANN's referral to the Standing Panel, Registry Operator may submit additional information or analyses regarding the likely effect on Security or Stability of the Registry Service.

(G) Upon its evaluation of the proposed Registry Service, the Standing Panel will report on the likelihood and materiality of the proposed Registry Service's effects on Security or Stability, including whether the proposed Registry Service creates a reasonable risk of a meaningful adverse effect on Security or Stability as defined below:

Security: For purposes of this Agreement, an effect on security by the proposed Registry Service shall mean (1) the unauthorized disclosure, alteration, insertion or destruction of Registry Data, or (2) the unauthorized access to or disclosure of information or resources on the Internet by systems operating in accordance with all applicable standards.

Stability: For purposes of this Agreement, an effect on stability shall mean that the proposed Registry Service (1) is not compliant with applicable relevant standards that are authoritative and published by a well-established, recognized and authoritative standards body, such as relevant Standards-Track or Best Current Practice RFCs sponsored by the IETF or (2) creates a condition that adversely affects the throughput, response time, consistency or coherence of responses to Internet servers or end systems, operating in accordance with applicable relevant standards that are authoritative and published by a well-established, recognized and authoritative standards body, such as relevant Standards-Track or Best Current Practice RFCs and relying on Registry Operator's delegation information or provisioning services.

(H) Following receipt of the Standing Panel's report, which will be posted (with appropriate confidentiality redactions made after consultation with Registry Operator) and available for public comment, the ICANN Board will have 30 calendar days to reach a decision. In the event the ICANN Board reasonably determines that the proposed Registry Service creates a reasonable risk of a meaningful adverse effect on Stability or Security, Registry Operator will not offer the proposed Registry Service. An unredacted version of the Standing Panel's report shall be provided to Registry Operator upon the posting of the report. The Registry Operator may respond to the report of the Standing Panel or otherwise submit to the ICANN Board additional information or analyses regarding the likely effect on Security or Stability of the Registry Service.

(I) The Standing Panel shall consist of a total of 20 persons expert in the design, management and implementation of the complex systems and standards-protocols utilized in the Internet infrastructure and DNS (the "Standing Panel"). The members of the Standing Panel will be selected by its Chair. The Chair of the Standing Panel will be a person who is agreeable to both ICANN and the registry constituency of the supporting organization then responsible for generic top level domain registry policies. All members of the Standing Panel and the Chair shall execute an agreement requiring that they shall consider the issues before the panel neutrally and according to the definitions of Security and Stability. For each matter referred to the Standing Panel, the Chair shall select no more than five members from the Standing Panel to evaluate the referred matter, none of which shall have an existing competitive, financial, or legal conflict of interest, and with due regard to the particular technical issues raised by the referral.


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